Aija Comes to Sharon!
Dec
17
11:00 am11:00

Aija Comes to Sharon!

Please join us on Saturday, December 17, from 11-5pm, for a holiday pop-up with our friends from Aija. Stop in and check out their unusual and affordably priced selection of great gifts and accessories curated from Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, China and the U.S. Everything from interesting jewelry, fabulous shawls and scarves, to pocketbooks and more--perfect for presents as well as a little personal indulgence! And while you're here, you can still browse the shelves for even more gift ideas.

KK Kozik: The Gold Rush
Dec
1
Dec 31

KK Kozik: The Gold Rush

Please join us on December 3, 2016 from 4-6pm for ­­­an opening reception for The Gold Rush, an exhibition of new work by artist KK Kozik. The show will be on view from December 1-31. 

Known primarily for her large-scale narrative oil paintings, KK Kozik’s latest series explores the possibilities of smaller-scale, illustrative pieces that draw their inspiration from Japanese woodblock prints and Persian and Mughal miniatures. Some of these influences are apparent in the works that depict imagery from vintage photos of exotic places on a ground of gold leaf, but others are more subtle, such as in her scenes of Alpine skiers against backdrops of aluminum leaf. While these metal-leafed surfaces might appear flat, direct light makes them come alive, revealing delicate textures and depths. They are all mounted on hand-made marbled papers, reinforcing their relationship to books and illustration.
 
KK Kozik’s work has been reviewed in numerous publications, including The New York TimesThe New YorkerArtforum, and Art in America. Previously, she was commissioned by the MTA to make two large-scale stained glass light boxes for the Rockaway Park-Beach 116th Street subway station and currently she is developing an installation project with the Fitchburg Art Museum in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.

Leora Armstrong: Walk the Line
Oct
20
Nov 13

Leora Armstrong: Walk the Line

Leora Armstrong’s spare, vibrant paintings are inspired by the memories of her childhood growing up on the remote Isle of Islay, off the western coast of Scotland. She translates these raw, empty landscapes into fields of space and light, with a subtle edge forming when the sky and land meet. Rather than being literal depictions of hills and sea and sky, her paintings are evocative of the feeling of being in a still, deeply remote place, humbled by its enormity. 

The combination of many almost-translucent layers of paint and the texture of brushstrokes give the seemingly flat expanses of color an unexpected depth. Colors change unpredictably as Armstrong paints, expressing the randomness of nature that she is constantly grappling with as she searches for a hue seen only for a fleeting moment. She often returns to Scotland where she continues to find inspiration in the lonely, quiet landscape: “When recently walking in Islay, I felt ‘my’ line again, walking the hilltops, the familiar margin I usually see and paint, safe in the knowledge that this ancient line is still defining the landscape.”  


Leora Armstrong grew up on the Isle of Islay, in the Inner Hebrides, Scotland and received a B.A. Hons from Chelsea School of Art, London. She currently lives in northwestern Connecticut. 

Colin McLain: Spy vs. Spy
Sep
15
Oct 16

Colin McLain: Spy vs. Spy

While vastly different, the art of fly fishing and old-school skater graphics have at least one thing in common: artist Colin McLain, who is drawn in equal measure to both subjects. For McLain, painting, like fly-fishing, is a deeply meditative act. Both have complicated processes that require patience, skill, and grace. He quotes Norman MacLean from A River Runs Through It to describe this resonance, “…all good things …come by grace and grace comes by art and art does not come easy.” Choosing the perfect fly mirrors so beautifully a painter’s color selection, while casting that fly parallels the act of applying the selected hue to canvas. 

While his soft, delicate brushstrokes depict the feathers and fur of hand-tied flies, his flat, neon forms recall the sometimes garish silk-screens of the 1970s and 1980s. Inspired by his love of skate culture and its iconography, he reanimates and reinvents those graphics by repeating them in dizzying, large-scale patterns. 


Colin McLain was born in Memphis, Tennessee and currently lives and works in Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut. He has shown his paintings at many galleries and museums nationwide and abroad. His work has been reviewed in The New York Times, Flash Art, and The New Art Examiner, he was a fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown and The Vermont Studio Center, and received a Rotary Fellowship to Italy. He teaches at Parsons School of Design. 

Moira Kelly: Diamonds and Rust
Jul
21
Sep 11

Moira Kelly: Diamonds and Rust

Please join us on July 23rd from 6-8 pm for a reception for Diamonds and Rust, an exhibition of works by artist Moira Kelly. The show will be on view from July 21-August 21.

Trained as both a painter and an art conservator, Moira Kelly’s work is grounded in an extensive knowledge of historical materials and processes. Her love of the physical aspects of art—the spreading of paint, the resonance of color, the patient layering of plaster over wood—give the pieces, despite their small size, a compelling presence. Kelly layers wood, plaster, tempera, oil and wax to create surfaces full of unexpected textures. These surfaces reflect a connection to ancient and natural forms, like the craggy rocks of the English countryside, and the cool, fragile surfaces of Italian frescoes.

Equally present is the influences of textile. Working within simple, economical boundaries—making a mark, then responding to that mark with another—she crafts geometric patterns in subdued hues of blue, red, white, and ochre. For Kelly, immediacy is essential for both making and viewing, each pieces’ approachable size and varied textures invite the viewer to not only look, but to touch.

Born in the northeast of England in the 1950s, Moira Kelly studied art history and painting with Richard Hamilton, Joseph Beuys and her fellow student, Sean Scully. She also studied art conservation in Germany and Italy before moving to New York City in the 1970s to work as an art restorer. She was the director of two contemporary art galleries in London before becoming the director of The Lawndale Art and Performance Center in Houston. She now has an independent art and furniture restoration company. 

 

Marta Lafuente: Spanish Castle Magic
Jun
2
Jul 3

Marta Lafuente: Spanish Castle Magic

Spanish Castle Magic is a rare opportunity for those of us stateside to see—in person—the work of Marta Lafuente who lives and works in Barcelona, Spain. She uses layers of materials—sketches, swathes of oil paint, collage, and marble dust—to build up landscapes and figures that oscillate between figuration and abstraction. They depict what a memory might truly look like: not the crisp, detailed images of a photograph, but hazy, half-remembered glimpses of an event, where some sections remain obscured, leaving others to stand out in sharp relief.

Featured in the show are her mixed-media paintings and an animated film accompanied by the pastel and graphite film cells that compose it. In her Tibidabo series, amusement park-goers are captured mid-flight on a swing carousel ride, either emerging from the ether or disappearing back into it. Her cityscapes rise out of green, marble-dusted landscapes into swirling clouds, castles in the air of some summer day in Spain. Her short animated films are composed entirely of hundreds of drawings, each one minutely different than the last. On their own they are small, masterfully drawn sketches; together they overlap and out of them arises something alive: the gestures of dancers, lilting and graceful, moving swiftly across the paper.

Marta Lafuente was born in Barcelona in 1976. After living in Bologna and Madrid, she returned to her home city where she currently teaches drawing and co-teaches MBA courses at the Universitat de Belles Arts de Barcelona. Her works are in the permanent collections of the Banc de Sabadell, Vila Casas, the Güell Foundations, and others. She regularly shows her work at the Ignacio de Lassaletta Gallery in Barcelona.

Matt Magee: How the West Was Won
Mar
31
May 30

Matt Magee: How the West Was Won

How the West Was Won is an exhibition of work by artist Matt Magee. The show will be on view from March 31-May 30. 

First you start in Paris, then down to Tripoli, up to London, then over to America: Texas, New York and now Arizona. This is how you get to Matt Magee. Generations of pioneers and artists have migrated to the American Southwest in search of the space and peace afforded by a desert landscape. After thirty years in the northeast, Magee is yet another one of these transplants and many of the works in this show have evolved out of his first few years in this environment.

One of Magee’s great talents lies in the ability to translate the workaday world into distinctive singular objects. He sees possibilities in the simplest of things: an ordinary car gasket, painted in just the right shade of red, becomes suggestive of a primitive map; an airport floor plan is rendered in paint and transformed into a drone floating in space; repetition turns everyday language into hieroglyphs that appear both foreign and familiar. Whether working with found objects, painting or printmaking, his worldview is always present. Just as Lewis and Clark sent back their written impressions, Magee does the very same in his work.

His works are in the permanent collection of the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the University of New Mexico Museum, the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation and others. It has also been widely exhibited for more than thirty years with recent solo exhibitions at inde/jacobs in Marfa, Texas and at John Molloy Gallery in New York. He currently lives and works in Phoenix, Arizona. 

Upstate Funk!
Feb
13
6:00 pm18:00

Upstate Funk!

Upstate Diary is a pioneering publication focused on the creative possibilities that thrive outside of city limits. Each issue reveals the private and creative lives of accomplished artists through insightful interviews and intimate photo essays. It explores the ways that natural beauty and the challenges of rural life inform and influence the creative processes among many of the artists it features.

Upstate Diary is the brainchild of Kate Orne, Swedish-born photographer and former Interview magazine editor as well as full-time upstate resident since 2009. While exploring the region, she was inspired to use her sophisticated skills to create a publication which featured and promoted its artistic heritage, rich cultural environment, and the wide range of accomplished and creative minds. 

Issue One, published in a limited edition of 1,000 hand-numbered copies, includes an in-depth interview with visual artist Carrie Mae Weems, who candidly speaks on race and inequality in art; artist and filmmaker Marianna Rothen speaking about her keen interest in distress as well as living on her farm without power or water; a photo essay on industrial designer Russel Wright's home, Manitoga; and much more.   

 

 

Adam Van Doren: The House Tells the Story
Nov
28
5:00 pm17:00

Adam Van Doren: The House Tells the Story

Adam Van Doren's latest book, The House Tells the Story: Homes of the American Presidents, is an account of his visits to fifteen presidential homes accompanied by watercolor paintings and letters from Van Doren to the author and historian David McCullough. The Wall Street Journal writes, "The House Tells the Story is an utter delight, as it opens windows into the history of this country by showing how some this country's makers and shakers lived."

Van Doren is a graduate of Columbia University and has published An Artist in Venice, with commentary by Simon Winchester and Theodore Rabb, and essays in American Artist Magazine and The New York Times, among others. He has written and directed two documentaries: James Thurber: The Life and Hard Times, and Top Hat and Tales: Harold Ross and the Making of The New Yorker. His artwork is included in the collections of the Art Institute of Chicago; The Wadsworth Atheneum; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Princeton University Art Museum; and The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. He teaches at Yale University, where he is also an Associate Fellow.

 

 

Jeannette Montgomery Barron: My Years in the 1980s New York Art Scene
Oct
15
Nov 1

Jeannette Montgomery Barron: My Years in the 1980s New York Art Scene

My Life in the 1980’s New York Art Scene (2014) was published in conjunction with a major exhibition of Montgomery Barron’s work at Collezione Maramotti, Reggio Emilia, Italy. A show of her black-and white portraits of art-world greats will accompany the book signing. Jeannette Montgomery Barron was born in Atlanta, Georgia and studied at the International Center of Photography in New York City. She later became known for her portraits of the New York art world in the 1980s, which were published in her first book, Jeannette Montgomery Barron (1989). Other publications include Photographs and Poems (1998), a collaboration with the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Jorie Graham; Mirrors (2004) with a text by the celebrated author Edmund White; Session with Keith Haring; and My Mother's Clothes. Scene (2013) is a remarkable compendium of portraits of renowned personalities from arguably the most exciting era of New York City underground culture—the 1980s—when the young and indomitable flocked downtown in search of places to work and live among like-minded collaborators. These musicians, filmmakers, painters, writers, fashion designers, publishers, actors, models, and photographers played together, worked together, made their own rules, and changed our culture, as we know it, forever. 

Her works are in numerous public and corporate collections, including The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; The High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Kunsthaus, Zurich; Collezione Maramotti, Reggio Emilia, Italy; and The Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. She has shown internationally at Galerie Bruno Bischofberger, Zurich; Scalo, New York and Zurich; Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta; ClampArt, New York; and Magazzino D'Arte Moderna, Rome.

 

 

Duncan Hannah: The Lost World
Aug
13
Sep 9

Duncan Hannah: The Lost World

Duncan Hannah's paintings are like puzzle pieces that stand alone but when put together might go like this: Take a drive from your house in Nash Terraces, Sussex Place, with Isabelle in your Blue Car to Southhampton where you might board The Olympic, the Queen Mary, or something from the New Zealand Line, then sail to New York and visit the Ghost of 61st St. (near Madison).

Or this: Summer, 1938, Leaving Shanghai (or was it Leaving Hong Kong?) en route to Scotland--remember catching Fireflies at Loch Lomond? (Regarding Pauline and her Scottish Teacup at The Albert Memorial--that secret is safe). Then south to England--Midsummer, Middlesex--magical.

Or this: Remember the car, the year, the place--my Bugatti, 1924, Cap d'Antibes--I met you on your Bike, you had just come from visiting the Villa Medici--where has the time gone...

Your imagination is the ticket.

 

 

Jeff Joyce: Wanderers
Jul
10
Aug 5

Jeff Joyce: Wanderers

Jeff Joyce won notice early in his career as part of a group of young painters known as the Neo-Romantics, who by evoking earlier artistic traditions “sought to restore the magic of art in a cynical climate dominated by rhetoric, the media, and the marketplace.”  Distinct from others in this group, however, Joyce’s works go beyond nostalgic or ironic reference to the past and suggest an ideal of the landscape as a private world.

Depicted in a subdued palette of blues, greens, and grays, often punctuated by an ethereal silver moon or a hazy yellow sun and isolating an iconic tree or a curving horizon, Joyce’s moody, expressive scenes offer a level of spiritual or symbolic meaning.  His work has been said to “illuminate the soul of the natural world as Whistler and Yeats did.”

Moira Kelly: Draw the Line
Jul
9
Aug 11

Moira Kelly: Draw the Line

Moira had me when she told me that she knew Jimi Hendrix when she was a teenager in Newcastle.  Nothing to do with art but everything to do with Street Cred.  I've known and admired her for several years and only realized quite recently that I hadn't actually seen her art.  I must have thought I did because I knew how good she was but I hadn't...  She's done several bits of restoration for me--always top notch, we've discussed art--hers and others'--endlessly on train rides into Manhattan together.  I've always known that she is ridiculously talented but nothing could of prepared me for my first visit to her studio to see the work that comprises Draw the Line.  It's striking.  It's warm.  It's regimented.  It's soothing.  It's cheery--I could go on but I'd rather show you it to you in person and let you see what you see.

Born in the North East of England in the 1950s, Moira Kelly studied art history and painting with Richard Hamilton, Joseph Beuys and fellow student, Sean Scully.  She studied art conservation in Germany and Italy before coming to New York City in the 1970s where she developed a practice as an art restorer.

She was the director of two contemporary art galleries in London under the aegis of The Arts Council of Great Britain, before returning to the U.S. to become the director of The Lawndale Art and Performance Center, in Houston.

She now has an independent art and furniture restoration company.

These works exemplify her long-standing interest in textile patterns, bespoke tailoring and fresco.

Terry Rosen: On the Street Where You Live
Mar
20
Apr 15

Terry Rosen: On the Street Where You Live

A native New Yorker, Terry Rosen began painting and drawing formally at the 92nd Street Y at age six. She received a B.A. in art history from Cornell University, where she studied fine art and architectural design, and an M.A. in computer graphics from the New York Institute of Technology.

Rosen got her start as an advertising illustrator for Bloomingdales and Macy’s and moved on to work in textile design. With a knack for making the inanimate come alive, she created for Nicole Miller iconic “conversational prints” that depicted familiar and found items such as food labels, fortune cookies, and personal ads. She also designed prints for Oleg Cassini.

A fascination with post-consumerism led Rosen to her recent focus on collage. Her colorful, quilt-like compositions are culled from the found art of city streets, the discarded artifacts of commerce and daily life. Ticket stubs, sales receipts, and gum wrappers are among the elements she collects and combines in journalistic fashion.

Rosen’s paintings have been exhibited in New York and Boston, and her corporate clients have included Absolut, Charles Schwab, and People. Her digital art has been published widely and shown in galleries and museums in the U.S. and Europe. 

Peter Bogardus: Out of Africa
Nov
22
Dec 11

Peter Bogardus: Out of Africa


"The trajectory of my life work has brought me to Seventeen Trees," Peter Bogardus says.  His most recent book, Seventeen Trees, Africa is an outgrowth from his travels in the continent, where  he has documented with his camera different aspects of African spiritual life in Senegal, The Gambia, Mali, Gabon, and Ethiopia. Again and again throughout his journeys he photographed extraordinary trees, and this book is his distillation of that time.

Bogardus studied art at Hampshire College, where he apprenticed to noted sculptor and printmaker Leonard Baskin, and at the New York Academy of Art and the International Center of Photography. The books he produces are beautiful objects in and of themselves, painstakingly crafted, with every step done by hand--from the snapping of a photograph to the working of the press. His books are in the collections of Yale University, Princeton University, Columbia University, The British Library, and The Library of Congress, as well as many other institutions and private collections.

 

Lisa Brody: Lush Life
Jul
12
Aug 7

Lisa Brody: Lush Life

 Lush Life presented several of Ms. Brody’s most recent oil on canvas landscapes that capture the play of light on verdant fields or luxuriant and leafy flora. Following in the great tradition of paintings inspired by natural beauty, she works outdoors with an easel and oils making small panels. She then enlarges these studies in her studio on tall and narrow canvas panels, applying layer upon layer of paint. “I begin my work intuitively, open to change, accident and transformation,” said Lisa Brody. “My paintings evolve slowly. Just as the weather can change, my painting process is sensitive to the subtle permutations of the atmosphere. ”

Also featured will be a selection of her unique artist books that depict celebrated gardens in and around New York City (Central Park, The New York Botanical Garden) and Litchfield County (Peter May, Michael Trapp, Hollister House, Oscar de la Renta). Rendered in watercolor and ink on a long contiguous sheet of paper, each “garden walk” is folded up into a Japanese-style accordion book. “The books record how my perspective shifts or is affected while meandering through a garden following the fleeting light,” said the artist.  “I’ve captured where my eye was drawn, from plantings to hardscapes to water features, to create a panoramic story that can be folded and unfolded again and again.”

Lisa Brody studied art at the University of Pennsylvania, (B.F.A andB.A. Fine Arts and Architecture) and the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture in Maine.  Her awards and recent residencies include Painting’s Edge Residency in California, Cooper Union Residency in Painting in New York City, and Vermont Studio Center Residency. With an exhibition career spanning more than two decades, Ms. Brody has art work in many private and corporate collections including IBM, Campbell’s, Equitable, Kaiser Permanente, HBO, Merck, Citibank, Banker’s Trust, The Hartford, Sumitono, and PepsiCo. The artist lives and works in South Kent, Connecticut.

Carol Leskanic: Adaptation
Jun
14
Jul 10

Carol Leskanic: Adaptation

Gilding, the centuries old art of applying gold leaf to a prepared wood or metal surface, is most commonly seen on antiques or as a decorative finish. Artist Carol Leskanic applies this ancient technique to unexpected objects such as a chandelier made from deer antlers, a vintage set of metal nesting tables, dried seahorses, and tree trunks. She then treats the gilded surfaces with a patina for a rich, deep, and consummately modern aesthetic. Her process is traditional, but the results are ethereal.

In addition to her gilded creations, the exhibition will also feature a series of Ms. Leskanic’s fine art panels. Comprised of dozens of layers of painted gesso, these monochromatic reliefs on wooden panels depict sublime abstractions of natural and organic forms.  “I’ve taken an historic technique, familiar and comfortable to me from working for so long as a gilder, and employed its materials as a medium for contemporary art,” said Ms. Leskanic from her studio in Sharon. “When successful, there is a particular beauty in the balance between the simplicity of a form and the intricacy of the materials.”

Sarah Blodgett: I Want Candy
Jul
29
Aug 22

Sarah Blodgett: I Want Candy

Sarah Blodgett has a knack for finding the charming and the playful in the most ordinary of things--in this case pieces of candy. This ability is surpassed only by her ability to imbue those same images with real artistic integrity. Her work has been published in Martha StewartQuest MagazineFine GardeningCountry Living Gardener, and The Knot to name a few. Her photographs help us narrow our visual field so that we stop and notice: We pay attention and feel the better for having done so. 

Tiana Peterson: Where Eagles Dare
May
27
Jun 21

Tiana Peterson: Where Eagles Dare

Tiana Peterson alters found material to create minimal installations and collage. She received her MFA from New York's School of Visual Arts in Photography, Video, and Related Media in May 2007. Since completing her degree she has exhibited at the Brooklyn Arts Council, Phoenix Gallery, Camel Arts Space, and Artforms Gallery. Tiana has lectured on her work at the Taliesin School of Architecture and taught photography at Molloy College and Montclair State University. 

 

Duncan Hannah: Race Cars!
Aug
22
Sep 20

Duncan Hannah: Race Cars!

There’s a private joy and a liberating sense of speed and motion in Duncan Hannah's portraits of racers shown speeding alone. Hannah is a devotee of mid-century British Grand Prix, when drivers raced around pastoral tracks in Vanwalls and Aston Martins. His inspiration comes from Old English racing magazines that he has subscribed to since he was a boy. For more immediate inspiration he attends the vintage car races at Lime Rock Park. Hannah divides his time between New York City and West Cornwall, Connecticut and was a 2011 Guggenheim Fellow.